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Four Smart Moves That Will Cut Expenses For Your Small Business

Garden Worker Holding iPadWhen it comes to keeping costs down, all small business owners know one thing: creativity is key. Following the same operations model used by larger organizations is challenging, if not impossible. Instead, you have to stay flexible and adapt to changing circumstances to turn a profit.

With that in mind, here are a few smart tactics for driving down costs for your business:

1. Stay on top of taxes
As a small business owner, you already deal with your share of uncertainty. You don’t need a major tax bill to surprise you at the end of the year, thank you very much.

To ensure that you’re always financially prepared for a curveball from Uncle Sam, put a set amount of money away every month specifically for the purpose of paying taxes. If you’re prepared, you’ll also avoid the late fees that come with missing a payment deadline.

And if you’re unsure about the taxes you might owe, you’ll first need to identify your small business legal structure.

2. Reap the rewards of remote
One of the biggest expenses of running a business is rent. Having to pay for a dedicated workspace and all the costs that come with it (e.g., utilities and equipment) can take a big bite out of your budget. Fortunately, it’s easier than ever to create a team that’s entirely remote. All you need is a reliable internet connection to send messages and even make phone calls.

3. Regularly review expenses
When you’re trying to get your business off the ground, don’t take any expense for granted. It’s a good idea to review your payments for things like vendor services once per month. And remember, it can’t hurt to try to negotiate. If you feel like you can get a better deal on, say, printing, talk to your vendor. They want your business as well, so they may be able to work with you.

4. Hire smarts over experience
Every business owner wants to hire the best and brightest talent for their team. However, a limited budget can make this difficult. So rather than looking for someone who’s several years into their career, consider trading experience for intelligence and ambition. You may have to spend a little more time training, but you’ll save money and potentially hire someone who can bring a fresh perspective to your business. Check out our tips for hiring your first employee.

 

This post was written by our partners at Balance.

Rivermark Business Partner Ecoheat

Business Story
Rivermark has been Ecoheat's financial partner since 2005, helping the business grow and thrive along the way.

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